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New York University School of Law

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New York University School of Law

The New York University School of Law (NYU Law) is the law school of New York University. Established in 1835, the school offers the J.D., LL.M., and J.S.D. degrees in law, and is located in Greenwich Village, in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

NYU Law was the first law school established in New York City. It is considered to be among the top ten most selective and prestigious law schools in the United States and is currently ranked 6th by the U.S. News & World Report. In terms of specialization, NYU Law is ranked in both International Law and Tax Law by the said report. The school is especially known for its dedication to the public sector, emphasis on diversity, and large firm placement. The median starting salary of NYU Law graduates working in the private sector was $160,000 for the class of 2008.

Academics

NYU Law publishes eight student-edited law journals, which are, in order of their founding:

  • New York University Law Review
  • NYU Annual Survey of American Law
  • NYU Journal of International Law and Politics
  • Review of Law & Social Change
  • Environmental Law Journal
  • Journal of Legislation & Public Policy
  • Journal of Law & Liberty
  • Journal of Law & Business

The law school's longstanding commitment to public service is exemplified by its many notable alumni and the Root-Tilden-Kern Scholarship Program, a full-tuition scholarship awarded each year to twenty students committed to public service.

NYU Law offers several fellowships to students admitted to the LLM Program. The most selective is the Hauser Global Scholarship: eight to ten top LLM students are admitted from all over the world. The scholarship includes full tuition waiver and reasonable accommodation costs. In addition, it offers the Hugo Grotius as well as Vanderbilt scholarships for International law studies and other branches of law respectively.

The Law school has a law and business program in which eight of the nation's preeminent student-leaders in law and business are awarded fellowships in the Mitchell Jacobson Leadership Program.

LL.M. in Taxation Program

NYU Law School's LL.M. in Taxation program is widely considered to be the strongest LL.M. in Taxation program in the United States, and has been consistently ranked by the U.S. News & World Report magazine since they started ranking specialty law school programs in 1992. Joshua D. Blank is currently the faculty director of the program. Tax LL.M. students are permitted to enroll in a general course of study or specialize in specific areas such as business taxation or estate planning. Due to its location in the heart of corporate America, many of the program's professors are the leading practitioners in their respective fields. LL.M is an abbreviation for Master of Laws, an advanced academic degree, pursued by those holding a professional law degree. In general, there are two types of LL.M. programs in the United States. The majority are programs designed to expose foreign legal graduates to the American Common Law. The other programs involve post doctoral study of a specialized area of the law such as Admiralty, Tax Law, Banking and Financial Law, Elder Law, Aeronautical Law or International Law.

Partnerships

In 2005, NYU Law entered into an agreement with the Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, in Toronto, Canada, that will allow select students to obtain a joint-Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) and JD, studying at both schools, in four years. The competitive program began in the fall of 2006 and accommodates up to 3 students per year. Since then, they have also implemented a jointly granted NYU/Osgoode LLB/LLM program in which graduates are granted the LLB as well as an LLM from NYU in only 3 and a half years instead of the normally required four. More recently, the NYU School of Law has entered into similar dual degree agreements with the National University of Singapore Faculty of Law and the University of Melbourne Law School. Oxford University has a program of academic exchanges with New York University School of Law, mainly involving Faculty members and research students working in areas of shared interest.

  • NYU Law offers a dual-degree program with Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. Students may earn a JD/MPA or a JD/MPP.
  • NYU Law offers a dual-degree program with Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Students may earn a JD/MPA.


Centers and Institutes

The Brennan Center for Justice is a progressive, non-partisan public policy and law institute that focuses on issues involving democracy and justice. The Center for Law, Economics and Organization promotes interdisciplinary research and teaching in law and economics. It is directed by Jennifer Arlen, Oren Bar-Gill, John Ferejohn, Mark Geistfeld, Lewis Kornhauser, and Geoffrey Miller.

The Center on Law and Security is an independent, non-partisan, global center of expertise designed to promote an informed understanding of the major legal and security issues that define the post-9/11 environment. Towards that end, the Center brings together policymakers, practitioners, scholars, journalists and other experts who might not otherwise meet to address major issues and gaps in policy discourse and to provide concrete policy recommendations. Its fellows include: Peter Bergen, Sidney Blumenthal, Peter Clarke, Roger Cressey, Joshua Dratel, Carol Dysinger, Barton Gellman, Bernard Haykel, Thomas Hegghammer, Brian Palmer, Michael Sheehan, Alexandra Starr, Robert Windrem, and Lawrence Wright. Its former fellows included: Paul Cruickshank, Amos Elon, Baltasar Garzón, Tara McKelvey, Dana Priest, and Nir Rosen. Through its many activities, the Center generates local, national, and international awareness of the legal dimension of security issues, including the Terrorist Trial Report Card, a comprehensive study on every terrorism prosecution in the United States since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

The Center on the Administration of Criminal Law is a think-tank dedicated to the promotion of good government and prosecution practices in criminal matters. The Center analyzes important issues in criminal law or having implications for the administration criminal law. In particular, the Center focuses on the exercise of power and discretion by prosecutors. The Center accomplishes its mission in three areas: academia, litigation, and participating in public policy and media debates. The Center's academic component gathers empirical research, publishes scholarship, and organizes and hosts conferences and symposia. The Center's litigation component uses the Center's research, experience, and expertise to litigate criminal cases or cases having implications for the administration of criminal law, particularly in cases in which the exercise of power and discretion by prosecutors raises substantive legal issues. The Center's public policy and media component seeks to improve public dialogue on criminal justice matters in various ways, including testifying before public officials and the publishing of op-ed pieces.

The Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy is a joint venture between the law school and NYU's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. It is an academic research center devoted to the public policy aspects of land use, real estate development and housing.

The Hauser Global Law School Program, launched in 1994, has moved NYU School of Law beyond the traditional study of comparative and international law to systematic examination of transnational issues and the development of new ways to train 21st-century lawyers. The Program incorporates non-U.S. and transnational legal perspectives into the Law School’s curriculum, promotes scholarship on comparative and global law, and brings together faculty, scholars, and students from around the world.

The Institute for International Law and Justice integrates the law school’s scholarly excellence in international law into the policy activities of the United Nations, non-governmental organizations, law firms, and industry.

The Institute for Law & Society is a joint venture between the law school and the NYU Graduate School of Arts and Science. It serves as an intellectual center for faculty, graduate students, and law students interested in studying law and legal institutions from an interdisciplinary social science perspective. It offers an opportunity to earn a J.D.-Ph.D or J.D.-M.A. dual degree in law and society.

The Institute for Policy Integrity is headed by Richard Revesz and Michael Livermore. It advocates for sound cost-benefit analysis at the state, national, and global levels.

The Pollack Center for Law and Business is a joint venture between the law school and the New York University Stern School of Business. The Center is designed to enrich the professional education of students of law and business and to facilitate joint teaching to involve leaders in banking, business, and law in the intellectual life of the University through sponsorship of meetings, conferences and dinners. The Pollack Center also offers a program for students to earn the Advanced Professional Certificate in Law and Business. The director is William T. Allen, a professor at the law school and former Chancellor of the Delaware Court of Chancery.

The Straus Institute for the Advanced Study of Law & Justice brings in as Fellows each year approximately 14 leading scholars from different disciplines and cultures. Each year the Straus Institute defines an annual theme that serves as the overarching subject around which the annual fora, colloquia and conference are set. The faculty director is Joseph H. H. Weiler.

The Tikvah Center for Law & Jewish Civilization is headed by Moshe Halbertal and Joseph H. H. Weiler. The foundational premise of the Center is 1) that the study of Jewish law can profit immensely from insights gained from general jurisprudence; and 2) that Jewish law and Jewish civilization can provide illuminating perspectives both on the general study of law as a per se academic discipline, and on the reflection of law as a central social institution refracting the most important issues in our society.

The U.S.-Asia Law Institute serves as a resource and partner to various Asian countries as they reform and further develop their legal systems and institutions. It also works to improve the understanding of Asian legal systems by lawyers, academics, policy makers and the public. The faculty director is Jerome Cohen.